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Least common multiple

least common multiple

The least common multiple of two or more non-zero whole numbers is the smallest number that can divide those numbers. To find the least common multiple, we will use a method in which we list all the multiples of the numbers in question, and then find the lowest common multiple for those numbers. The lowest common multiple of numbers a and b is denoted as LCM (a, b). We will now move on to an example. We need to find the least common multiple of 9 and 30. We will get the multiples of the numbers by multiplying them with 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and so on.

Multiples of 30 are: 60, 90, 120, 150, 180…
Multiples of 9 are: 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90, 99…
The lowest number that can be created by multiplying the numbers 30 and 9 with other numbers and that is a multiple of them both is the number 90. That means that the lowest common multiple of the numbers 30 and 9 is the number 90.

lcm of numbers 9 and 30

The method described above can be used to find the lowest common multiple of three numbers as well. For example, now we will find the LCM of 6, 9 and 12.
Multiples of 6 are: 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42…
Multiples of 9 are: 18, 27, 36, 45…
Multiples of 12 are: 24, 36, 48, 60…
The lowest multiple that all three numbers have in common is 36. So, 36 is the LCM of 6, 9 and 12.

lcm of numbers 6, 9 and 12

There is also another method for finding the lowest common multiple. In this method we need to divide the numbers into prime factors through a process called factorization. Then we need to find the largest count for each of the prime factors of those numbers and write them down. After that, we just need to multiply those numbers by themselves the largest number of times they appear in any of the factorizations, then multiply all those values together and we will get the lowest common multiple. Seems complicated? It really isn’t. Just take a look at the following examples.

We’ll find the lowest common multiple of numbers from our previous examples using this new method. For example, we will find the lowest common multiple of 9 and 30 by going through the following steps:
-> Find the prime factors of 9 and 30.

prime factors of number 9

The prime factors of the number 9 are \ 9 = 3 * 3.

prime factors of number 30

The prime factors of the number 30 are 2, 3 and 5.

-> Now we need to count the number of times each factor of the numbers appears in the factorization. For the number 9, the number 3 appears twice. For number 30 the factors 2, 3 and 5 appear once.
-> In this step we need to write all the different factors of 30 and 9 and write down the biggest number of appearances of that factor. The number 2 appears once in number 30. The number 3 appears once in number 30 and twice in number 9. We need to write the biggest number of appearances down, and that is twice. The number 5 appears once in number 30.
-> Now we only need to multiply the numbers we have written down in the previous step. The lowest common multiple is the product of those numbers.

lcm equals 90

The number 3 appears twice, so we had to multiply it by itself twice (as in 3*3) in the final result of the lowest common multiple. Numbers 2 and 5 appeared only once and we only had to multiply them once.
Now we are going to find the lowest common multiple of 6, 9 and 12.
-> Step 1: find the prime factors.

prime factors of three numbers

-> Step 2: write down the biggest number of appearances of factors in 6, 9 and 12. The number 2 appears twice. The number 3 appears twice as well.
-> Step 3: find the lowest common multiple by multiplying the numbers from the previous step.

lcm equals 36

Both of the methods are fairly simple and easy to use. You will need to brush up a bit on your factorization skills, but the rest is just following the steps described above.

Least common multiple worksheets

  LCM of two numbers up to 30 (75.1 KiB, 492 hits)

  LCM of two numbers up to 50 (91.5 KiB, 404 hits)

  LCM of two numbers up to 100 (100.1 KiB, 747 hits)

  LCM of two numbers up to 500 (132.9 KiB, 451 hits)

  LCM of two numbers up to 1000 (165.8 KiB, 558 hits)

  LCM of three numbers up to 30 (82.4 KiB, 421 hits)

  LCM of three numbers up to 50 (94.6 KiB, 354 hits)

  LCM of three numbers up to 100 (106.3 KiB, 417 hits)

  LCM of three numbers up to 500 (147.0 KiB, 812 hits)

  LCM of three numbers up to 1000 (199.2 KiB, 792 hits)

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